Hotels, such as the Hotel Avannaa in Greenland, are one example of some of the economic opportunities that Inuit businesses could profit from with the changing economic landscape in the region. (Credit: Patrick Rasenberg/Flickr)
Hotels, such as the Hotel Avannaa in Greenland, are one example of some of the economic opportunities that Inuit businesses could profit from with the changing economic landscape in the region. (Credit: Patrick Rasenberg/Flickr)

Inuit Want Economic Organisation


Various Inuit Organizations are looking to create a transnational economic organization that will benefit Inuit businesses and help increase Inuit influence in the world.

Inuit from across the North have come together to discuss the idea of creating a transnational Inuit Economic Organization that would bolster the opportunities and power of Inuit businesses in the world. During the recent Circumpolar Inuit Economic Summit many Inuit economic leaders, from Canada, Greenland, the United States, and Russia, met to discuss shared opportunities and potential collaboration.

Clint Davis, one of the Canadian delegates and a Partner in Acasta Capital Indigenous (ACI), sat down and spoke to the High North News about the potential of an International Inuit Economic Organization. When asked about the outcomes and purpose of the Summit, Mr. Davis replied, “Ultimately what we are trying to do is to make sure that there is an association which can act as a forum for Inuit Corporations to work together, to share best practices, to learn from one another, to share those opportunities that we can pursue collectively, and effectively act in partnership with the Inuit regions and Inuit governments.”

Although these transnational conversations will need to deal with many complicated issues, Jimmy Stotts, the president of Inuit Circumpolar Council of Alaska, in an interview with ADN, said he hopes to see the organization formed by next year, but potentially even as early as this year.

Such an organization is an important move, especially with the impacts that climate change could have in the coming years on the type and quantity of businesses in the region. Mr. Davis commented that, “you will probably see an increase in resource development, Arctic tourism, greater routes of trade, and investment infrastructure.  We [as Inuit] want to make sure we have the network, the voice and the tools to ensure that we are the first movers as opposed to sitting back and watching companies, coming up from the south, exploiting what is happening in the North.”

Mr. Davis commented that he “saw this collaboration as an opportunity to work together, maybe create a business that can compete in the South and on an international level.” Collaboration in the North will likely be one of the keys for Inuit businesses as the Arctic landscape both physically and metaphorically changes.

 

Clint Davis is one of the Canadian delegates working towards creating a transnational Inuit economic organization. (Credit: Clint Davis)

Clint Davis is one of the Canadian delegates working towards creating a transnational Inuit economic organization. (Credit: Clint Davis)

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